Another Small Update

Hello,

I don’t write about my personal writing life much on this blog, but I would like to do that more. So, here’s an update about what I’ve been doing lately.

In November, I completed nanowrimo and have what I hope will become a complete draft of my first short novel. Right now, I am in the process of re-reading it, and creating a new outline that will indicate the final plot, highlighting what plot holes need to be filled, what sub plots will be dropped and which ones will be brought to the forefront. It is my hope that this will lead to a complete draft that can be proofread, beta-read, and edited.

In the past couple of months, I’ve also generated some youtube content, which was so much fun and I hope to do more of. There’s a guided meditation for writers, and a dramatic reading of my creepypasta story “Parasites.” I’m still keeping up with my fiverr.com gigs, and a few of those have been featured on websites. I am also looking at some paid blogging gigs. This is all a little hard, because I do also work 40 hours a week at a job that I really do love and feel privileged to have, but that can be very draining at times.

Thank you all for your continued support, and best wishes to all of you.

 

Georgette

Women In Non Fiction

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In my previous article “Women Are Not Small Dogs” I presented a short list of tips that I hoped people might find useful in writing female characters. Thank you to everyone who read it. To follow up, I decided to write another article providing tips for non-fiction articles. I hope people find this article useful.

  1. Men Aren’t Everyone: Don’t use words like “People” and “Everyone” when you are referring specifically to men. This is one of those things that is so common you don’t even notice it. But, once you notice it, you realize that this is everywhere.
  2. Not Everyone Is a Man: Don’t use words like “Men” or “Guys” when you are speaking generally about everyone. Once again, you’d be shocked at how often this happens.
  3. Women Read, Too: When you write an article and address the reader as “You,” do not assume that the reader is male; especially when you are writing on a gender –neutral subject. Once again, you’d be surprised how many completely neutral writing, science, or computer articles will address the reader as “You” and then make statements that assume that “You” are male.
  4. Being a Man Is Morally Neutral: Avoid saying someone should “Man up” or “Be a man” when you think they should do something good, or saying that someone is “not a real man” when someone has done something bad. Being male and being female are both intrinsically neutral. Maleness is not a virtue, and equating masculinity with virtue makes no sense. What does being male have to do with virtue? Objectively, nothing.
  5. A Woman Is an Adult: Women are adults. Girls are children. Both men and women may refer to adults of either gender in the child form. This is obviously fine in an informal setting if everyone is comfortable with it. However, when writing professionally, it trivializes female contributions to the subject you’re writing about to refer to them as children.

 

Most of these things are so common and seem so normal that most people do them without even thinking. Writing this article, I myself had to edit it several times to keep from directing my article to male readers. I’ve seen women do these things, too. But, when everyone works together to take care of these smaller things, and we are no longer so used to them that we no longer see them, we can then begin to change the way we all see ourselves and each other and work towards true equality.

Nanowrimo Woes

I admit it. Today, I am frustrated.
I am going to participate in Nanowrimo, as I usually do. If you are asking what “Nanowrimo” is, please check this link. I feel like the program has done a lot for me in terms of helping me learn about motivation, setting goals, and writing no matter what, even if I feel like what I’m writing isn’t good enough. It’s also put me in touch with wonderful writers and creative people.
There is a project that is very dear to me.  The plan is to have it be my Nanowrimo project this November. There is a rather terrible unfinished first draft that is 50 thousand words long, but has no real conclusion, is full of plot holes, and needs major restructuring to be a completed first draft. This in and of itself is not a problem, or something that I feel bad about. It’s a Nanowrimo draft. But, the task of re-reading it, making notes on everything that needs to be torn out and rebuilt, realizing how much I have to do before November 1st, and getting it all done and doing a good job is overwhelming me.
This is why I’ve been so busy, and have been slow to update my blog. So, forgive me for that.
I can admit. The reason I have blogged so many times about overcoming procrastination is because I myself have a problem with it. I know this. In a way, I am sad because I feel like it’s my own fault that I am finding myself without enough time to do the job I want to do to be ready for November. Shaming myself isn’t going to help, and I realize that this is making things worse, not better. But, it’s still hard to abstain from completely.
So, I am facing a dilemma. I could pick another project (I usually have multiples) that is closer to completion. In a way, this feels like accepting defeat. Besides, this project is my favorite. Another possibility is to say the next week-and-a-half is longer than it feels right now, and that I can push through this. This is more satisfying, but I fear that the project might suffer for it, and I don’t want it to.
It seems to me that I should just push on, get as much done as I can. I should just prioritize and get the biggest things out of the way. And, if I don’t get everything done I want to on the planning side, well, I should forgive myself.
I’ve made up my mind that’s what I should do. And, I think I’ve come to that decision while writing this blog entry. Maybe I sound self-indulgent right now; maybe I even sound whiny. I think that this is the one of the first times I’ve used this blog as an actual blog, instead of a place to write articles about writing.